Author: Jocelyn Palomino

Raritan Pathogens Results 9.28.2023

by LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

The Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County run a volunteer pathogens monitoring program from May to September every summer along the Raritan River. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

With the scattered rain we’ve had across the area this week, our water quality samples taken on September 28, 2023 show Enterococcus bacteria levels exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at four of our sites. However, the expected rain and runoff for this weekend will likely affect these results. Problem sites are indicated by red frowns on the map and chart which includes: Riverside Park (Piscataway), Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick), Edison Boat Basin (Edison), and Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville). Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation and include: South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy) and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Such pathogens may pose health risks to eople fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always remember to wash thoroughly after enjoying your weekend activities on the Raritan!

Although it was a chilly morning, our volunteers for the week made sure to bundle up for the weather, Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

Genevieve and Irene collecting data ashore our South Amboy site, Photo Credit: Frank Dahl

Piash put the waders on this week to use our monitoring equipment, Photo Credit: Frank Dahl

Don’t forget to keep an eye out for our stickers with a QR code to our results! Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

Raritan Pathogens Results 9.21.2023

by LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

The Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County run a volunteer pathogens monitoring program from May to September every summer along the Raritan River. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

Our water quality samples taken on September 21, 2023 show Enterococcus bacteria levels exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at our three most upstream sites this week. Problem sites are indicated by red frowns on the map and chart which includes: Riverside Park (Piscataway), Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick), and Edison Boat Basin (Edison). Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation and include: Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville), South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy), and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Such pathogens may pose health risks to people fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always remember to wash thoroughly after enjoying your weekend activities on the Raritan!

Our team of volunteers at Riverside Park early on Thursday morning, Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

Broken Ganesh sculptures in the shallow waters at Riverside, Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

A great day for fishing on the Raritan, volunteers shared the dock with some folks at the Edison Boat Basin, Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

Raritan Pathogens Results 9.14.2023

by LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

The Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County run a volunteer pathogens monitoring program from May to September every summer along the Raritan River. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

Once again, our water quality samples taken on September 14, 2023 show Enterococcus bacteria levels exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at only one of our sites this week. Problem sites are indicated by red frowns on the map and chart which includes our most upstream site for the 5th week in a row: Riverside Park (Piscataway). Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation and include: Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick), Edison Boat Basin (Edison), Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville), South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy), and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Such pathogens may pose health risks to people fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always remember to wash thoroughly after enjoying your weekend activities on the Raritan!

This is what our trunk looks like during monitoring season… filled with plenty of supplies such as gloves, hand sanitizers, calibration buffers, and of course our monitoring equipment! Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

Piash Ahamed and Frank Dahl working together to record the data off the YSI, while Genevieve is in the water (with waders) holding the probe, Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

Frank Dahl checking out the CSO found at the end of 2nd Street Park in Perth Amboy, it is occasionally open with an active discharge after heavy precipitation events, Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

As always, thanks to our team of volunteers who came out this Thursday: Frank Dahl, Genevieve Ehasz, Piash Ahamed, and board president Heather Fenyk!

Raritan Pathogens Results 9.07.2023

by LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

The Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County run a volunteer pathogens monitoring program from May to September every summer along the Raritan River. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

Our water quality samples taken on September 7, 2023 show Enterococcus bacteria levels exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at only one of our sites this week. Problem sites are indicated by red frowns on the map and chart which includes our most upstream site: Riverside Park (Piscataway). Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation and include: Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick), Edison Boat Basin (Edison), Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville), South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy), and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Such pathogens may pose health risks to people fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always be sure to wash thoroughly after any recreational activities and have a safe weekend on the Raritan!

Low tide at our first site in Piscataway as Genevieve retrieves our samples for the week, Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

Keep an eye out for our stickers posted at all our monitoring locations with a QR code leading directly to our weekly results, Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

Special thanks to Genevieve Ehasz and Heather Fenyk for taking care of our sampling this week! Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

Raritan Pathogens Results 8.31.2023

by LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

Happy September! We are now in our final month of the volunteer pathogens monitoring program for this summer. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites along the Raritan River, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

For your Labor Day weekend plans, please take into consideration the data from our water quality samples taken on August 31, 2023 which show Enterococcus bacteria levels exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at two of our sites this week. Problem sites are indicated by red frowns on the map and chart which includes: Riverside Park (Piscataway) and Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick). Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation and include: Edison Boat Basin (Edison), Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville), South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy), and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Such pathogens may pose health risks to people fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always be sure to wash thoroughly after any recreational activities and have a safe weekend on the Raritan!

High tide flooded the dock at the Rutgers Boathouse and kept a few volunteers from reaching the sampling point, at least we took pictures in the meantime! Photo Credit: Jocelyn Palomino

This week, Colleen brought along a very special guest, her son Josh! He did an excellent job helping his mom collect the data off the YSI on our sampling run yesterday, Photo Credit: Jocelyn Palomino

A shot of our Sayreville site, a beautiful morning for monitoring, Photo Credit: Jocelyn Palomino

After all these months, Colleen has become a pro at managing all the monitoring equipment in the water, Photo Credit: Michele Bakacs

As always, big thanks to the volunteers who came out this week: Irene Riegner, Frank Dahl, Middlesex County Agent Michele Bakacs, Genevieve Ehasz, Josh L. and Colleen Georges! Photo Credit: Colleen Georges

Raritan Pathogens Results 8.24.2023

by LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

The Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County run a volunteer pathogens monitoring program from May to September every summer along the Raritan River. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

Our water quality samples taken on August 24, 2023 show Enterococcus bacteria levels exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at only one of our sites this week. Problem sites are indicated by red frowns on the map and chart which includes: Riverside Park (Piscataway). Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation and include: Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick), Edison Boat Basin (Edison), Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville), South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy), and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Many beaches and rivers have placed health advisories, and even closed, due to the high levels of fecal coliform in the waters across New Jersey these past few weeks. Such pathogens may pose health risks to people fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always remember to wash thoroughly after enjoying your weekend activities on the Raritan!

Low tide and overcast skies during our Thursday morning of monitoring, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

The outfall at the Rutgers Boathouse in New Brunswick was exposed at the time we collected our sample due to the low tide, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Our amazing team of volunteers (including Rose behind the camera) on the docks at the Edison Boat Basin, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Frank Dahl is always ready to spot all types of wildlife with his binoculars, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Another great week of water quality monitoring thanks to our volunteers: Piash Ahamed, Genevieve Ehasz, Irene Riegner, Colleen Georges, Frank Dahl, and Sheyla Casco! Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Raritan Pathogens Results 8.17.2023

by LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

The Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County run a volunteer pathogens monitoring program from May to September every summer along the Raritan River. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

Our water quality samples taken on August 17, 2023 show Enterococcus bacteria levels exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at our three upstream sites this week. Problem sites are indicated by red frowns on the map and chart: Riverside Park (Piscataway), Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick), Edison Boat Basin (Edison), Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville). Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation which includes: South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy), and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Many beaches and rivers have placed health advisories, and even closed, due to the high levels of fecal coliform in the waters across New Jersey these past few weeks. Such pathogens may pose health risks to people fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always remember to wash thoroughly after enjoying your weekend activities on the Raritan!

Broken clouds this Thursday morning…we had a visitor attentively watch over us at our first monitoring site in Piscataway’s Riverside Park, Photo Credit: Jocelyn Palomino

The docks at Rutgers Boathouse were being power-washed before we grabbed our samples, which may be the reason enterococcus results are high at this site this week, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

A tall, great blue heron waiting for us on the dock where we collect our sample…what a great day to be out monitoring! Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Messy docks once again as we reach our fourth site of the day, Ken Buchanan Riverfront Park in Sayreville, Photo Credit: Jocelyn Palomino (left), Rose Lawless (right)

Genevieve Ehasz waded into the water this week to collect our samples, while the rest of the volunteers collectively gathered data from the shore, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Raritan Pathogens Results 8.10.2023

by LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

The Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County run a volunteer pathogens monitoring program from May to September every summer along the Raritan River. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

Our water quality samples taken on August 10, 2023 show Enterococcus bacteria levels DO NOT exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at any of our sites this week. Problem sites are normally indicated by red frowns on the map and chart. Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation which includes: Riverside Park (Piscataway), Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick), Edison Boat Basin (Edison), Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville), South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy), and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Many beaches and rivers have placed health advisories, and even closed, due to the high levels of fecal coliform in the waters across New Jersey these past few weeks. Such pathogens may pose health risks to people fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always remember to wash thoroughly after enjoying your weekend activities on the Raritan!

A beautiful morning to be out doing some water quality monitoring! Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Every one of our volunteers play an important role in collecting our weekly data, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless (left) and Colleen Georges (right)

A shot of the canal by the docks at the Edison Boat Basin after grabbing our samples, Photo Credits: Rose Lawless

Frank Dahl was happy to volunteer wading into our last two sites for the week, Photo Credit: Colleen Georges

Big thanks to our volunteers of the week: Frank Dahl, Rose Lawless, Sheyla Casco, Piash Ahamed, and Colleen Georges

Raritan Pathogens Results 8.03.2023

by LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

The Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County run a volunteer pathogens monitoring program from May to September every summer along the Raritan River. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

Our water quality samples taken on August 3, 2023 show Enterococcus bacteria levels DO NOT exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at any of our sites this week. Problem sites are normally indicated by red frowns on the map and chart. Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation which includes: Riverside Park (Piscataway), Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick), Edison Boat Basin (Edison), Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville), South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy), and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Many beaches and rivers have placed health advisories, and even closed, due to the high levels of fecal coliform in the waters across New Jersey these past few weeks. Such pathogens may pose health risks to people fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always remember to wash thoroughly after enjoying your weekend activities on the Raritan!

In our newly implemented “VIP of the week” for the Summer Pathogens Monitoring program, we were joined by none other than Mayor Brian Wahler of Piscataway, who was happy to help out the volunteers with data collection and ready to environmental health with us! Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

At our following site, we were joined on the docks by VIPs Mayor Foster-Dublin of Highland Park and New Brunswick City Planner Dan Dominguez. Our volunteers did a stellar job showing them our water quality monitoring process! Photo Credit: Heather Fenyk

The seagulls always make sure to leave a mess on the docks at our Sayreville site, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Volunteer Irene Riegner had the opportunity use the waders for the first time at our South Amboy Riverfront, always a fun experience! Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Special thanks to our volunteers of the week: Isha from Fahrenfeld Lab, Rose Lawless, Colleen Georges, Frank Dahl, Irene Riegner, and Piash Ahamed! Photo Credit: Colleen Georges

Raritan Pathogens Results 7.27.2023

LRWP Outreach Monitoring Coordinator Jocelyn Palomino

The Lower Raritan Watershed Partnership and Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Middlesex County run a volunteer pathogens monitoring program from May to September every summer along the Raritan River. We collect water quality samples at non-bathing public access beach sites, provide our samples to the Interstate Environmental Commission for analysis in their laboratory, and report the results to the public on Friday afternoons.

With a continuation of rainfall this week, our water quality samples taken on July 27, 2023 show Enterococcus bacteria levels exceed the EPA federal water quality standard at four of our sites. Problem sites are indicated by red frowns on the map and chart which includes: Riverside Park (Piscataway), Rutgers Boathouse (New Brunswick), Ken Buchanan Waterfront Park (Sayreville) and 2nd Street Park (Perth Amboy). Green smiles on the chart and map indicate sites with bacteria levels safe for recreation and includes: Edison Boat Basin (Edison), and South Amboy Waterfront Park (South Amboy).

Enterococcus and Fecal Coliform levels are used as indicators for the possible presence of disease-causing bacteria in recreational waters. Many beaches and rivers have placed health advisories, and even closed, due to the high levels of fecal coliform in the waters across New Jersey these past few weeks. Such pathogens may pose health risks to people fishing and swimming in a water body. Possible sources of bacteria include Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), improperly functioning wastewater treatment plants, leaking septic systems, and stormwater run off.

Our goal in reporting these results is to give area residents an understanding of potential health risks related to primary contact (touching) the water during water based recreation. Always remember to wash thoroughly after enjoying your weekend activities on the Raritan!

While collecting samples at Rutgers Boathouse, we had a few visitors who were not afraid to approach us! Photo Credit: Colleen Georges

A great view of our team of volunteers on the dock at Edison Boat Basin, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Frank Dahl and Irene Riegner are always ready to help gear up at our wading site in South Amboy, Photo Credit: Sheyla Casco

Foamy waters at Perth Amboy’s 2nd. Street Park, Photo Credit: Rose Lawless

Thanks to our committed team of volunteers for coming out this week during the intense heat: Frank Dahl, Rose Lawless, Piash Ahamed, Sheyla Casco, Irene Riegner, and Colleen Georges! Photo Credit: Colleen Georges

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